Four Seasons Gardening in Maine

posted in STEM on September 8th, 2016

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STEM, Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, icons, symbols.

All are invited to attend the next NASA STEM seminar on Tues., Sept. 13th from 12:15pm – 1:15pm in the YCCC Mid-Café. This event is FREE and Open to the Public. 

Four Seasons Gardening in Maine

Gardening doesn’t have to stop when the traditional growing season ends in Maine. By using simple, small, movable hoophouse/greenhouses or low tunnel structures that you can build yourself, you can start growing winter greens in late summer and keep them going right through the winter. You can then use the same structures to boost spring and summer season crops. In this workshop/discussion ideas will be provided along with pictures and plans and which hardy greens to use for winter growing and when and how to get them started.

SPEAKER: Frank Wertheim  – Associate Extension Professor of Agriculture/Horticulture with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension

Frank S. Wertheim is an Associate Extension Professor of Agriculture/Horticulture with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension based in York County, ME. During his 29 year Cooperative Extension career Wertheim has developed educational programs for the farming and gardening communities across Maine. Wertheim is committee chair of the Maine Hunger Dialogue http://extension.umaine.edu/programs/hunger-dialogue/about engaging Maine college students and campus communities in the fight against hunger by providing a platform that: 1) raises awareness of the issue and 2) provides opportunities for students to actively work to address hunger on their campuses and communities in collaborative partnerships with their institutions. Wertheim is state coordinator for the Maine Harvest for Hunger program: https://umaine.edu/harvest-for-hunger working with Master Gardeners, farmers and gardeners statewide to grow, glean, harvest and donate over 200,000 lbs. of fresh vegetables annually to over 200 state food pantries and soup kitchens. For the past 24 years he has coordinated the York County Master Gardener Volunteer program with 190 active volunteers engaged in over 50 educational community projects teaching others to grow their own food including: Kids Can Grow (an innovative youth gardening program developed in York County); community gardens; the Garden Angel program (assisting seniors and persons with disabilities to be able to continue gardening); demonstration gardens; and school gardens teacher and staff training. Wertheim is a founder and active planning team member of the York County Farmers Network, a community of farmers that promotes supports and strengthens local agriculture through informal gatherings, demonstrations, and information and resource sharing. His research has explored the utilization of beneficial mycorrhizal fungi to boost agricultural production.